Guam: Local Travel Info

Micronesia's most populous island

Guam Local Travel Info

Internal flights and major international airports in Guam

Guam is served by Won Pat Guam International Airport, and this is the only civilian air route on or off the island. Flights can be taken direct from parts of Australia, Asia and from Honolulu. The airport is just 4 miles from Agana, the capital of Guam.

Getting to and from the airport in Guam

The airport is conveniently and centrally located. Outside the arrivals terminal there is a large taxi rank, with drivers able to take you to almost any destination on the island that you require. There are also several private shuttle bus operators, and many hotels engage their own shuttle buses between the hotel and airport. Be sure to enquire about this service when booking you accommodation.


Travel costs


Renting cars in Guam

Renting a car is an excellent way of getting around Guam. The island is small enough to get wherever you need to go with relative ease. Car hire is provided by all the big names such as Hertz, Avis and Nissan. There are also several other smaller, independent car hire firms. The independent firms offer older cars for as little as $20 per day, but expect to pay anything up to $60-$100 for a newer car from one of the bigger firms. It is also necessary to take into account insurance. Some firms will require either a minimum age of minimum amount of years’ driving history. A valid drivers license is required for all rentals.

To book car rental in Guam online, view our Car Hire section for Guam. We offer Ok Alpha users the latest special offers and best rates available for car hire in Guam. We advise you book your Guam hire car in advance so you can pick it up and drop it off directly at the airport.

Drivers license requirements?

A fully valid drivers license from a recognized country is required to drive in Guam. It is advisable to take your full license, both paper and ID card parts. Photocopies are not accepted. Guamanians drive on the right hand side of the road, and the speed limit on most major highways is a highly restrictive 35 mph, though this rises to 45 mph in the less densely populated areas. Children are required to wear a seatbelt, and motorcyclists must wear helmets. Drunk drivers face license suspension, and even minor amounts over the prescribed limit result in heavily extended penalties.


Buses in Guam

Buses are available in Guam, but they are extremely few and far between. It is much more preferable to rent a car or, for shorter and more infrequent journeys, take a taxi. There are two firms, one called ‘Gray Line’ and one called ‘The Shopping Bus’ that will take tourists between shopping and tourist destinations for a small fee, generally around $2. A more cost effective way of using the services, however, is to buy a pass for either 1, 3 or 7 days, depending on how long your stay on the island is. Gray Line also offer a $25 ‘tour’ option, which will take tourists on a comprehensive 4 hour island tour, taking in all the island’s major sights, attractions and shopping opportunities. Another alternative is to rent a ‘scootercar’, which is essentially a small, convenient buggy, to get from A to B.

Taxis in Guam

Taxis are widely available on Guam, and can be found in most towns, at the airport, or are available from pre-booked private hire firms. The downside to this, however, is that they are generally fairly expensive. Rates start at $3.00 cover fare, and then $0.60 per mile after that. Taxis in Guam are well regulated and, should you feel you have been overcharged, several avenues of complaint exist. Information about this can be found in the tourist offices and at the airport. The average wait for a pre-booked taxi is around 10 minutes, and it is advisable to ensure that you agree the fee in advance if this service is not metered.


Cycling in Guam

Getting around Guam by bike is simply not an option. Unless you are a serious or professional cyclist (of which, ironically, there are many in Guam), cycling is not safe. Few main roads in Guam have sidewalks, and none have cycle paths. This is a great shame as Guam’s wonderful scenery and idyllic views would lend it perfectly to cycling. Guam also has a notably high instance of drunk driving incidents involving cyclists, and a hazardous stray dog population (yes, there are lots of them!). If you do insist on cycling around the island then be certain to wear a helmet, signal clearly, and hope for the best!

Hitch hiking in Guam

Hitch hiking is possible on Guam, but not advisable. The roads are not safe places to hang around waiting for a lift, or to walk on while you wait. Drivers in Guam are notably courteous and helpful to other drivers, but hitching is not common.